Navajo, Navajo language, Navajo Reservation, Arizona, Uncategorized

Yá’át’ééh, Brody, It is Good

Before I moved to Page Arizona, I always thought the traditional Diné (Navajo) greeting was pronounced Yah-ta-hey. Someone just smack me.

customs and traditions

On Thanks

I'm not talking about Mayflower Pilgrims and Native Americans; I'm talking about finding opportunities to be thankful even when there doesn't seem to be much to be thankful for. 

customs and traditions, Navajo

When a Navajo Introduces Herself, She Gives her Genealogy

Navajo culture and society are organized matrilineally. Similar to the western patrilineal system of family organization, emphasis is put on the clan of the mother, and mothers are the heads of households and central focus of each clan. 

Burry Port, Wales, Davies/Davis, Eisteddfod, Llanelly Wales, Mary Davis Skeen, Plain City, Utah, Thomas Davies 1816-1899, Welsh Maritime History

Let’s get this Story Started

Can I ask you for your help? I've been researching and gathering information about the life of Mary Davis Skeen off and on for several years. Thanks to great record-keeping by Davis and Skeen family genealogists and local historians, I have plenty of information to tell a complete story from beginning to end. But Mary… Continue reading Let’s get this Story Started

Cousin Connection Project, customs and traditions, genealogy, Kwiatkowski, Recipe

Cousin Connection #3: John Woodgie

The Duck, The Whole Duck, and Nothing but the Duck Quack. But seriously, my New York cousins from my dad's generation are very Polish. I mean, many of them speak the language, and even if they don't, they know a few words here and there and even understand much of the Polish dialogue. Even my father, who… Continue reading Cousin Connection #3: John Woodgie

cousins, Recipe

Babci Mary’s Polish Soup

Once I decided to share the recipe, I realized I would need to figure out exactly how Bernie and I are related. Given the small-sized communities in the region where my father was born, It becomes pretty obvious that anyone with a common surname is going to be related. Bernie was very obliging . . .

customs and traditions

Traditional Christmas Eve in Poland- Wigilia w Polsce- tradycje

pexels-photo-253342Just found this blog post today. I love it because it gives insight to Polish traditions and life in Poland from the prospective of a transplant. One of my New Year’s resolutions is to post weekly. Having three active blogs, this may seem difficult, but having access to great re-posts such as this one will make things a bit easier.

RazemUtah

In Poland, Christmas Eve is a day first of fasting, then of feasting. The Christmas Eve feast begins at the appearance of the first star. There is no red meat served but fish, usually carp. The supper, which includes many traditional dishes and desserts, can sometimes last for over two hours. It is followed by the exchange of gifts. The next day, the Christmas Day, is often spent visiting friends and family. In Polish tradition, people combine religion and family closeness at Christmas. Although gift-giving plays a major role in the rituals, emphasis is placed more on the making of special foods and decorations.

As mentioned before on the night of Christmas Eve, so important is the appearance of the first star in remembrance of the Star of Bethlehem. On that evening, children watch the sky anxiously hoping to be the first to cry out, “The star has come!” Only after…

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